Archive | Oil and Gas Sector-Politics and Image

Trump trade tirades show Canada has never needed new pipelines more, energy leaders warn – by Geoffrey Morgan (Financial Post – June 14, 2018)

http://business.financialpost.com/

CALGARY — U.S. President Donald Trump’s blistering comments about Canadian trade underscore the need for Canada to find new outlets for its oil, the head of the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers said Tuesday.

“If there’s ever been a time for reflection about ‘Why wouldn’t we have optionality?,’ it is now,” CAAP president and CEO Tim McMillan told the Global Petroleum Show in Calgary.

Given Trump’s comments about trade with Canada being “fool trade,” McMillan said it’s time for Canadian politicians to assist in building new pipelines to the East Coast and to British Columbia’s northern coast to reduce Canadian dependence on the U.S. market. Continue Reading →

Trump trade tirades show Canada has never needed new pipelines more, energy leaders warn – by Geoffrey Morgan (Financial Post – June 13, 2018)

http://business.financialpost.com/

Canadians need to take control of our economic destiny — Alberta Premier Rachel Notley

CALGARY — U.S. President Donald Trump’s blistering comments about Canadian trade underscore the need for Canada to find new outlets for its oil, the head of the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers said Tuesday.

“If there’s ever been a time for reflection about ‘Why wouldn’t we have optionality?,’ it is now,” CAAP president and CEO Tim McMillan told the Global Petroleum Show in Calgary.

Given Trump’s comments about trade with Canada being “fool trade,” McMillan said it’s time for Canadian politicians to assist in building new pipelines to the East Coast and to British Columbia’s northern coast to reduce Canadian dependence on the U.S. market. Continue Reading →

Political schizophrenia, hypocrisy and fantasy make Canada’s pipeline-killing cocktail – by Gwyn Morgan (Financial Post – June 5, 2018)

http://business.financialpost.com/

Fossil fuels supply more than 80 per cent of global energy – most of which is crude oil. Meanwhile, Canada, with the third-largest oil reserves, produces less than four per cent of global crude supplies

The political discourse surrounding Canada’s oil industry has morphed into a combination of schizophrenia, hypocrisy and fantasy. This debilitating countrywide phenomenon is clearly exemplified at both the federal and provincial levels.

But it’s the recent actions of B.C. Premier John Horgan and his government’s power-sharing puppet-master, Green party leader Andrew Weaver, that deserve to be nominated for special recognition.

Horgan wins the political schizophrenia award for filing a court case that would allow the province to stop the export of oil from the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion while simultaneously filing a separate court case aimed at preventing Alberta from reducing the amount of oil shipped through the existing line. Alberta Premier Rachel Notley summarized his behaviour succinctly by stating, “They want our oil, but they don’t want our oil.” Continue Reading →

Trans Mountain is the cost of Corporate Canada surrendering to green enemies – by Terence Corcoran (Financial Post – May 30, 2018)

http://business.financialpost.com/

With the pipeline fiasco, Canada has now come face to face with the ultimate and disastrous consequences of the grand coalition that has seized control of national policy-making.

The Trudeau government’s desperate decision to ultimately purchase the Trans Mountain pipeline — for the alleged “fair price” of $4.5 billion — is the logical outcome of an incoherent governance regime controlled by a triumvirate of social, political and economic institutions.

The institutional troika is made up of green activists, pandering politicians and capitulating corporations. All are jointly and severally responsible for creating the current legal and economic crisis over Canada’s energy and resource developments, with many more crises to come. Continue Reading →

Globe editorial: Ottawa throws your money at its pipeline problem (Globe and Mail – May 30, 2018)

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/

When Prime Minister Justin Trudeau kept telling Canadians, “We are going to get the pipeline built,” they probably didn’t think that by “we” he meant them. They saw it as more of a royal “we” that referred to his government’s efforts to help Kinder Morgan complete the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline on budget.

But no. Ottawa announced Tuesday that it will lend Kinder Morgan money to ensure that construction scheduled for this summer begins on time, and will furthermore buy the pipeline from the Texas company for $4.5-billion. The government expects to become the owner of the existing pipeline by August, and to bear the cost of completing the expansion that has been pegged at more than $7-billion.

In the meantime, Ottawa will look for another company to buy the pipeline, but in all likelihood that will take years. It’s safe to say the Government of Canada will still be in the pipeline business after the general election in 2019. Continue Reading →

The Trans Mountain pipeline expansion must be built – by Rachel Notley (Vancouver Sun – May 22, 2018)

http://vancouversun.com/

For a number of years, I lived in Vancouver. I loved it. Diverse, and forward-looking, Vancouver embodies so much about what makes Canada great. My feelings about Vancouver are shared by countless Albertans who have deep roots in B.C. through family, friends and business.

So when Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson says that Alberta’s energy industry “represents a tiny fraction of the overall economy and job count,” Albertans quite rightly get their backs up. In a country as diverse as ours, we are bound to have disputes, but it is important that we base our arguments on facts, not convenient fictions.

So let me correct the record.

Tens of thousands of British Columbians work in Alberta and pay taxes in B.C. — 50,000 at last count. The energy sector contributes 10 per cent to Canada’s GDP, and mining, oil and gas is responsible for 28 per cent of private non-residential investment in B.C. and employs hundreds of thousands of Canadians. So, Mayor Robertson is wrong. Canada’s energy industry is hugely important to the national economy, including B.C.’s. Continue Reading →

The pipeline to the future doesn’t carry the jobs of the past – by Mike Robinson (Troy Media – May 20, 2018)

https://troymedia.com/

The ruckus over the Kinder Morgan project is a good reminder that the economic conditions we once enjoyed are on the way out

While the opinion writers and politicians are venting about expanding the Kinder Morgan pipeline for diluted bitumen to the West Coast, it might help to consider some history.

We didn’t arrive at this shout-fest without making diverse tracks from previous experiences, and most of us are old enough to think back over a few previous decades, or read about circumstances further back still.

My take on this mess starts with two grandfathers from the British lower middle class who didn’t see an employment future in London. So in 1910 they each took a boat to Montreal and hopped on the Canadian Pacific Railway to British Columbia. One got off at Revelstoke, the other in Vancouver. Continue Reading →

‘Ready and prepared to turn off the taps’: Notley issues stark warning to B.C. as pipeline fight escalates – by Geoffrey Morgan (Financial Post – May 17, 2018)

http://business.financialpost.com/

CALGARY – Alberta Premier Rachel Notley threatened to cut off oil shipments to British Columbia “very quickly” on Wednesday, as her government passed its controversial new law that grants the government sweeping new powers over oil and gas shipments.

Notley said she would use the law, first introduced last month and passed Wednesday, if construction does not begin on Kinder Morgan Canada’s $7.4-billion Trans Mountain pipeline expansion soon.

“Albertans, British Columbians and the rest of Canada should understand that if the path forward for the pipeline through B.C. is not settled soon, I am ready and prepared to turn off the taps,” Notley said Wednesday. Continue Reading →

Like it or not, crude oil is the biggest reason for Canada’s prosperity – by Patricia Mohr (Financial Post – May 17, 2018)

http://business.financialpost.com/

Even at the bottom of the oil-price correction in 2016, crude remained the largest positive contributor to Canada’s merchandise trade, generating a $33-billion surplus

The oil industry looms large in the Canadian economy and, in many ways, pays the rent in Canada. Yet many Canadians appear unaware of how critically important the oil industry is to the national economy, a fact often lost in the debate over the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion.

Canada is a trading nation. We owe our economic prosperity and relatively high per-capita income to trade — and crude oil dominates that trade.

In 2014, before the oil-price downturn, crude oil alone generated a $70-billion trade surplus for Canada — excluding smaller surpluses in refined petroleum products and natural gas — far outstripping any other export category (the closest is metals and minerals) and helping to offset large, chronic deficits in autos and parts, industrial machinery, electronic goods and consumer products. Continue Reading →

The case for nixing carbon taxes – by David Black (Globe and Mail – May 15, 2018)

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/

David Black is the chairman of Black Press Ltd. and founder of Kitimat Clean.

Our country must focus on three vital things: develop more good jobs, because many are disappearing; build new businesses that can be taxed, rather than increase the burden on existing taxpayers; and improve our physical environment while we do this.

One obvious way to achieve this is to encourage “value-add” in the oil industry. Instead of exporting our crude oil to other countries, let’s process it here.

Refineries can be built along British Columbia’s coast employing large numbers of workers in good-paying jobs for decades and generating massive new taxes for our governments. (It is uneconomic to build export refineries in Alberta, which is why there are none there. All export refineries in the world are built on the ocean.) Continue Reading →

It’s time for Alberta to demand a fairer deal from Canada – by Brian Jean (Financial Post – May 15, 2018)

http://business.financialpost.com/

Albertans have carried the weight of Confederation on their shoulders for several decades and have spent billions on services for other provinces

A column in Maclean’s last month told Albertans to “Get A Grip” in regard to the pending demise of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. “You are not victims,” Stephen Maher lectured us.

“You should count your blessings, stop feeling sorry for yourselves and quit yelling at people who disagree with you.” I would argue that it’s not Alberta that needs to get a grip. It’s those that believe constitutional rights are meant to be one-sided.

Albertans have disproportionately carried the weight of Confederation on their shoulders for the last several decades on almost every metric. Between 2007 and 2014, Alberta was the only province to not be a net-positive recipient from the federal government. Continue Reading →

Anti-pipeline activists like SumOfUs kill investment and foment chaos, so they can brag: we win campaigns – by Claudia Cattaneo (Financial Post – May 12, 2018)

http://business.financialpost.com/

It’s Annual General Meeting season, that annual spring ritual when publicly traded companies hold meetings with shareholders that are so staged and so predictable that it’s also known as silly season.

This week, one AGM stood out for its silliness, thanks to the orchestrations of anti-pipeline activists to embarrass Kinder Morgan Inc., proponent of the $7.4 billion Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, at its meeting in Houston.

SumOfUs, an online advocacy group, has been in Kinder Morgan’s crosshairs for a while. It has put pressure on Wall Street and other investors to block what it calls “one of Canada’s most notorious extreme energy projects.” Continue Reading →

Pipeline advocates’ newest weapon: the radical protester – by Gary Mason (Globe and Mail – May 11, 2018)

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/

Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson says Kinder Morgan’s proposed Trans Mountain pipeline expansion will not be built because of opposition forces on the ground.

I have news for the mayor. If anything, it’s going to be the radical resisters who strengthen growing support for the project and put Premier John Horgan’s NDP government increasingly on the wrong side of the issue.

Mr. Robertson made his prediction in a recent interview with Bloomberg News in New York City. “I don’t think the resistance on the West Coast is going to fade,” the mayor said. “I think it will only intensify. Escalation looks likely.” He then added he doesn’t “think this project will go.“ Continue Reading →

Overwhelmed railroads threaten Canadian export economy – by Jen Skerritt, Kevin Orland and Federic Tomesco (Toronto Star/Bloomberg – May 9, 2018)

https://www.thestar.com/

WINNIPEG—Every day for more than six months, Jessica Raycraft has confronted hulking mounds of evidence of the great Canadian bottleneck. They’re stranded on her farm — wheat, peas and canola in 91-metre-long, 3-metre-high bags, an astonishing 50,000 bushels, enough to fill 15 rail cars.

“Nobody would take it,” Raycraft said from her home near Tramping Lake in Saskatchewan. It wasn’t until a few weeks ago that space finally opened up on freight trains, and then the fields were such a mess of mud from the spring melt that the bags were stuck. “We couldn’t move it.”

That pretty much sums up the problem with Canada. Its railroads are overwhelmed, threatening the country’s standing as a major exporter of commodities and slamming businesses — from relatively modest ones such as Raycraft’s to the likes of oil-giant Cenovus Energy Inc. — that have precious few transportation alternatives. Continue Reading →

The U of A isn’t ‘brave’ for honouring Suzuki. Just the opposite – by Rex Murphy (National Post – May 5, 2018)

http://nationalpost.com/

At the deep centre of conventional wisdom no concept is more hallowed, more warmly cradled in the blanket-robes of political correctness than the Green dogma of global warming. For millions upon millions it is grant-subsidized Holy Writ.

Governments fatten its evangelists with unheralded largesse. Its advocate-missionaries are legion, gathering in ritual conclave every year in rich, well-lit capitals to renew their fervour and refresh their zeal.

Rio, Geneva, Copenhagen, Rome are their jet-set Stations of the Cross, the United Nations their cathedral home, its Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change a new curia stuffed with failed weathermen, cranky researchers, the blazing-eyed mystics of Gaia, all duly attended by a docile, uninquisitive, co-opted press corps. Honours drop on its prophet-priests as do “the gentle rains from heaven.” Continue Reading →