OPINION: Doug Ford’s repeal of the Far North Act won’t gain the respect of Indigenous communities – by Dayna Scott (Globe and Mail – March 25, 2019)

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/

Dayna Scott is York University Research Chair in Environmental Law & Justice in the Green Economy and associate professor at Osgoode Hall Law School and the Faculty of Environmental Studies.

Late last month, Ontario’s Progressive Conservative government confirmed that it plans to repeal the Far North Act, seeking to reduce “red tape” and increase “business certainty” in the Ring of Fire – a mineral deposit located near James Bay. While Premier Doug Ford is not the first to think he has found a key to unlocking the resource potential of Ontario’s north, this strategy is sure to backfire.

Ontario’s far north is inhabited almost exclusively by Indigenous peoples with ancestral homelands in the area covered by Treaty 9. It is a vast landscape of swampy boreal forest, a gigantic carbon sink that is also home to rare creatures such as the woodland caribou and the wolverine.

Except for the De Beers diamond mine near Attawapiskat, there has been almost no industrial scale development in the whole region, which is why mining the hyped-up nickel and chromite deposits in the Ring of Fire region will require major new roads and other infrastructure.

When the Liberals first introduced the Far North Act in 2010, they did so over the objections of the Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN). The plan was to “protect” 50 per cent of the boreal wilderness, while “partnering” with First Nations in decision-making and revenue-sharing so as to facilitate mining.

But while celebrated as an ecological victory, the scheme was actually designed to manage the increasing volume and credibility of claims to Indigenous governance authority in the region.

For the rest of this article: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/article-doug-fords-repeal-of-the-far-north-act-wont-gain-the-respect-of/

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