Archive | Canadian Regional Media and Web Publications

Development group lands $1.1 million for mining centre – Staff (Northern Ontario Business – January 15, 2019)

https://www.northernontariobusiness.com/

Waubetek’s Centre of Excellence for Indigenous Mineral Development was launched in 2015

The Waubetek Business Development Corp. has received a key piece of funding to help them move forward with a Centre of Excellence for Indigenous Mineral Development. On Jan. 15, the federal government announced $1,131,913 from FedNor to help fund the project, which was launched in 2015.

The project will help engage Indigenous people in the mines and minerals industry in Northern Ontario, creating new employment and business opportunities. It will also assist mining companies to address critical gaps in numerous mining-related occupations.

“Our First Nations’ primary interest is to ensure that we are adequately consulted when it comes to mining and exploration within our traditional territories and to ensure that we have more opportunities to participate in the benefits that might come from this development in a sustainable way, including meaningful jobs, business opportunities, joint management and care of the lands on which these projects operate,” said Martin Bayer, Waubetek’s chair, in a news release. Continue Reading →

Nutrien merger effects ongoing one year later – by Ashley Robinson (The Western Producer – January 14, 2019)

https://www.producer.com/

WINNIPEG – After clearing various regulation hurdles, Agrium and the Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan merged together at the start of 2018 to become the world’s largest fertilizer company, Nutrien. At the time Nutrien had made various promises and many in Western Canada were cautious, hoping for the best but not fully knowing what to expect.

Now a year later, Nutrien has begun to settle into its new role in the agriculture world and according to retailers and producers it hasn’t really shaken things up all that much. However, there are a few things that still have many in Western Canada cautiously watching.

“I don’t want to pretend to call it a non-event because there’s always a concern about consolidation and all I can say at the moment is it doesn’t have any obvious impact,” said Ray Redfurn, president and founder of Redfern Farm Services in southwestern Manitoba. Continue Reading →

Sudbury Accent: Lots done, lots still to do, top biologist John Gunn (Living With Lakes Centre) says – by Donald Macdonald (Sudbury Star – January 12, 2019)

https://www.thesudburystar.com/

John Gunn is a fisheries biologist who has for the past 25 years studied the effects of acid rain, climate change, and a variety of other environmental factors on coldwater fish communities. As the director of the Living with Lakes Centre in Sudbury and Canada Research Chair in Stressed Aquatic Systems, he is now leading a team of researchers in the study of the effects of multiple stressors on Shield ecosystems.

He is also investigating the recovery processes that operate once stressors are removed. Lakes near Sudbury, are particularly important for the recovery studies. Emissions of air pollutants in this area have declined by about 90 per cent in recent decades and many aquatic systems are beginning to recover. Here, he takes time to answer The Star’s 10 questions.

Forests are often described as the lungs of the planet, and freshwater as its lifeblood. Sudbury has plenty of both, although the former was missing for quite a while. Can you talk a bit about the relationship between the two and how regreening has benefited our lakes and rivers? Continue Reading →

Vale in it for the long haul, says COO: Ricus Grimbeek talks future of nickel mining – by Karen McKinley (Northern Ontario Business – January 11, 2019)

https://www.northernontariobusiness.com/

The mining industry is rapidly moving toward digital technology, and Sudbury could be at the heart of it with careful planning, said Vale’s Ricus Grimbeek. The chief operating officer for Canada, the U.K, and Asian refineries was the guest speaker at a Greater Sudbury Chamber of Commerce President’s Luncheon Series on Jan. 10 at the Radisson hotel.

His message was clear: Vale has a decades-long plan to stay in the region, as well as help the city become the global hub of digital mining as it transforms the industry.

“I was talking to somebody and they said they thought there was maybe five good years of mining left here, and asked what I thought and I said, no,” he said. “They asked if it was less or more.” For Vale, he said the mining company is looking at at least 20 to 30 more years of production in the basin alone. Continue Reading →

A record year for Kirkland Lake Gold: Production, expansion at Macassa has northeast miner poised for growth in 2019 and beyond – by Staff (Northern Ontario Business – January 9, 2019)

https://www.northernontariobusiness.com/

Kirkland Lake Gold announced record levels of annual and quarterly production from its mines in northeastern Ontario and Australia. The Toronto-based global miner said total 2018 production at its three cornerstone mines was a record 723,477 ounces, up 21 per cent from the 596,405 ounces from the previous year.

Each of three achieved record annual production last year, including 356,230 ounces at Fosterville in Australia, 240,126 ounces at Macassa in Kirkland Lake, and 58,633 ounces at the Taylor Mine near Matheson.

The Holt Mine, also near Matheson, produced 67,770 ounces for the year. Total production in the fourth quarter of 2018 reached 230,993 ounces, 28 per cent higher than the previous record of 180,155 ounces achieved in the third quarter of last year. Continue Reading →

Sudbury’s future exciting — and electric — Vale COO – by Jim Moodie (Sudbury Star – January 11, 2019)

https://www.thesudburystar.com/

When asked recently if he thought Sudbury could expect another five good years of mining, the answer Ricus Grimbeek gave was ‘no.’ It wasn’t, however, because the chief operating officer for Vale’s North Atlantic Operations feels activity will dry up sooner than that.

“I had my poker face on,” he told a crowd gathered for a Chamber of Commerce luncheon on Thursday. “I believe there’s an amazing future here in Sudbury for the next couple of decades, not just the next five years.”

Driving that confidence is an expected boom in electric vehicles, which require copper and nickel for their batteries. Grimbeek, who hails from South Africa but now lives in Sudbury, said part of the reason he joined Vale was the opportunity “to absolutely impact the climate-change work we need to do as a society.” Continue Reading →

Greater Sudbury loses a mining legend, community activist – by Mary Katherine Keown (Sudbury Star – January 11, 2019)

https://www.thesudburystar.com/

Smiley is gone, but not forgotten. Sudbury lost a beloved father and husband recently, when Gord Slade passed away this week.

“Some of my earliest and most vivid memories were him taking us out into the bush — teaching us how to hunt, how to fish, teaching us all about nature,” son Fred Slade said Thursday. “He grew up in the bush, in northern Manitoba during the Depression.”

Born on Feb. 12, 1929, in Swan River, Man., Slade was one of 11 children. Most have passed away, but he is survived by his brother Johnny. Slade said growing up, they “lived off the land.” “They were 10 miles from the nearest town, on the side of the railroad tracks,” Slade said. In fact, the family’s homestead was so remote, Gord was homeschooled until he was 10 years old. Continue Reading →

Feds plan $90M in support for Sault, Algoma Steel – by Andy Blatchford (Sudbury Star – January 10, 2019)

https://www.thesudburystar.com/

Canadian Press – OTTAWA — The federal government is to announce up to $90 million in support for Ontario’s Algoma Steel on Thursday in a commitment aimed at helping the producer deal with the American tariffs on steel and aluminum, The Canadian Press has learned.

Economic Development Minister Navdeep Bains will make the announcement at Algoma’s plant in Sault Ste. Marie. He’ll be joined by Ontario Northern Development Minister Greg Rickford, who’s expected to announce a separate provincial investment in the company.

The government support comes as Canadian steel and aluminum producers continue to face punishing levies imposed last June by U.S. President Donald Trump. Continue Reading →

Former Sudbury Falconbridge General Manager/President Gord Slade passes away (Sudbury Northern Life – January 9, 2019)

https://www.sudbury.com/

Gord Slade was a community leader

Gord Slade, a Sudbury community leader and philanthropist, died Jan. 8, just a few weeks before his 90th birthday.

Slade, a graduate of McGill University (1951), retired from Falconbridge Ltd. after 32 years of service in 1984. He held the post of president of the Canadian Nickel Division and general nanager, Sudbury Operations, after serving in areas of increasing responsibility.

In an interview for the Canadian Mining Hall of Fame, Slade said, “My objective was to be a shift boss, make $10,000 a year and be as well liked as my dad.”

After retirement, Slade worked as a mining consultant and continued to participate on the boards of several mining corporations.

He was a leader in the Canadian Institute of Mining (Sudbury Branch chair, and vice-president for District 3), and was a recipient of the CIM Fellowship Award (1997). Continue Reading →

Nickel Outlook 2019: No Boom, but Batteries Loom – by Scott Tibballs (Nickel Investor News – December 23, 2018)

Nickel Investor News

Nickel was as hard hit as other base metals in 2018 as investor sentiment bled the markets, leading to lower prices even as demand increased. Analysts predict that nickel prices will stay low through to 2019, barring any significant improvements in the seemingly deteriorating US-China trade rhetoric.

Additionally, the much-touted battery metal boom might well not happen in any meaningful way for nickel in the near term, as markets learn more about just how far the electric vehicle (EV) industry has to go, and how quickly consumers need to adopt new technology for the boom to materialize.

New developments throughout Australia and headaches for miners in the Philippines dominated supply-side news, while demand meant that over the year stockpiles were drawn down. Continue Reading →

First Nations win annual payment case – by Harold Carmichael (Sudbury Star – December 27, 2018)

https://www.saultstar.com/

SUDBURY – First Nations in Northern Ontario have a won a lawsuit that will require federal and provincial governments to pay them higher annuities.

“It feels great,” said Mike Restoule of the Nipissing First Nation near North Bay, who filed the lawsuit on behalf of 21 First Nations in the Robinson-Huron treaty area. “We heard the court ruling and it came down in our favour, but I don’t really have details,” he said.

“I find that the Crown has a mandatory and reviewable obligation to increase the treaties’ annuities when the economic circumstances warrant,” wrote Justice Patricia Hennessy in her decision. “The economic circumstances will trigger an increase to the annuities if the net Crown resource-based revenues permit the Crown to increase the annuities without incurring a loss.” Hennessy said the two sides need to sit down and negotiate new terms. Continue Reading →

Anglo American management shake-up sees Brazil-based CEO replaced – by Cecilia Jamasmie (Mining.com – January 3, 2019)

http://www.mining.com/

Global miner Anglo American (LON:AAL) announced Thursday changes at the top that will see Ruben Fernandes, chief executive officer of the company in Brazil, being replaced by mining veteran Wilfred (Bill) Bruijn, effective March 1.

Fernandes, who has led Anglo’s iron ore and nickel interests in the South American country for almost three years, will become CEO of Base Metals. That position is currently held by Duncan Wanblad, who will now focus solely on his role as Group Director of Strategy and Business Development, the group said in a statement.

During his management, Fernandes dealt with an eight-month stoppage at the company’s giant Minas Rio iron ore mine, located in the Brazilian resource-rich state of Minas Gerais. Operations there were halted in March last year, following the discovery of leaks in a pipeline that carried ore to a port in Rio de Janeiro for export. Continue Reading →

The Congo’s increasing instability heightens critical minerals concern – by Greg Klein (Resource Clips – January 3, 2019)

http://resourceclips.com/

This is the place that inspired the term “crimes against humanity.” As a timely new book points out, American writer George Washington Williams coined that phrase in 1890 after witnessing the cruel rapaciousness of Belgian King Leopold II’s rubber plantations in the country now known as the Democratic Republic of Congo.

After rubber, the land and its people were exploited for ivory, copper, uranium, diamonds, oil, ivory, timber, gold and—of increasing concern for Westerners remote from the humanitarian plight—cobalt, tin, tungsten and tantalum. Controversy over recent elections now threatens the DRC with even greater unrest, possibly full-scale war.

The country of 85 million people typically changes governments through coup, rebellion or sham elections. Outgoing president Joseph Kabila ruled unconstitutionally since December 2016, when his mandate ended. Continue Reading →

Farewell to Paul Reid, Greater Sudbury’s camera-shy economic development wizard – by Darren MacDonald (Sudbury Northern Life – December 21, 2018)

At the 2010 PDAC Convention (L to R) Ian Wood, Former Sudbury Mayor John Rodriguez, Helen Mulc and Paul Reid. (Photo by Stan Sudol)

https://www.sudbury.com/

Veteran city economic development staffer is retiring after two decades on the job 97

Far from the headlines – and well behind the scenes (or the curtain, if you will) — Paul Reid has spent the last two decades working to grow Greater Sudbury.

The economic development officer did make headlines briefly in 2012, when he was able to salvage a plan to build a chromite smelter in Greater Sudbury, way back in the days when Cliffs Resources still owned the major Ring of Fire deposits. The company had come here to scout a location, which proved unsuitable. They turned to Reid, a veteran in the department who knew the area as well as anyone, who found an alternative within minutes.

“(Cliffs) wanted a brownfield, they wanted it near rail, they needed hydro and they needed it to be away from built-up areas,” former Ward 7 Coun. Dave Kilgour said at the time. “Reid suggested an old mine site north of Capreol.” Continue Reading →

IAMGOLD getting ready to hire for new gold mine south of Timmins – by Len Gillis (Timmins Daily Press – December 21, 2018)

https://www.timminspress.com/

Company said the hiring process is about to begin.

IAMGOLD and Sumitomo Metal Mining Co. are getting ready to begin hiring for jobs related to the construction of the Côté Gold Project south of Gogama.

The two companies are in a joint venture on the new open pit gold mine that was formerly known as the Trelawney Project, about 130 kilometres south of Timmins. The project is located just a few kilometres west of Highway 144. A company update revealed that construction for the new mine is slated to begin in 2019 and the company is looking to hire the right people.

“During this time, Côté Gold will be recruiting for key management and supervisory roles in mining, geology, operations and maintenance as well as support roles,” said the company newsletter. Continue Reading →