Archive | Canadian Regional Media and Web Publications

A new book says self-imposed obstacles block U.S. self-sufficiency – by Greg Klein (Resource Clips – March 4, 2019)

http://resourceclips.com/

“The Middle East has oil, China has rare earths.” Deng Xiaoping’s 1992 implied threat became all too real eight years later in the Senkaku aftermath, when RE dependency put Japan and the West at China’s mercy.

But just as the United States overcame the 1973 OPEC embargo to become the world’s leading oil producer, that country can overcome its growing reliance on dodgy sources of mineral production and processing. So say authors Ned Mamula and Ann Bridges in Groundbreaking! America’s New Quest for Mineral Independence.

Their country’s problem isn’t geology but policies, the book argues. Repeatedly pointing to Canada and Australia as role models, the authors say their own country’s mining potential can restore mining self-sufficiency, or at least minimize a crippling dependency. Continue Reading →

More women in mining ‘matters,’ Sudbury engineer says – by Harold Carmichael (Sudbury Star – March 9, 2019)

https://www.thesudburystar.com/

Samantha Espley will never forget her first day when she joined Falconbridge Limited not long after obtaining an engineering degree from the University of Toronto in 1988. “It was a sea of men,” she recalled, during her breakfast address Friday at the Steelworkers Hall on Brady Street to celebrate International Women’s Day. “I was so shocked. Over the years, I felt self-righteous. ‘How come there’s not enough women?’

“But over my 30 years, I realized there’s no women in the pipeline. There’s no females to draw from. There’s no women for the big companies to hire coming out of the schools and trade schools.”

Espley is the current director of Mining Technology & Innovation for Vale Base Metals, leading a team of highly specialized engineers and scientists providing technical support to Vale’s operating mines and projects in Canada, Brazil, New Caledonia and Indonesia. Continue Reading →

Ford’s rejection of mining plan ‘disappointing’ – by Paul Lefebvre (Sudbury Star – March 10, 2019)

https://www.thesudburystar.com/

Paul Lefebvre is Member of Parliament for Sudbury and parliamentary secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources.

This past weekend at PDAC 2019 – the international mineral exploration and mining convention – our government joined with our provincial and territorial partners to launch the Canadian Minerals and Metals Plan.

I’m very proud of this plan. It covers issues that are key to a successful and modern minerals and metals industry: competitiveness, the participation of Indigenous peoples, community benefits, respect for the environment, scientific and technological innovation, and global leadership.

All of these objectives are familiar to us here in Sudbury and Northern Ontario, where responsible mineral exploration, production and processing have become second nature. These are priorities shared by the key stakeholders in the sector across the country. We know this because we worked extensively with industry organizations, as well as environmental groups, labour organizations, and municipalities to create this plan. Continue Reading →

HISTORY: Museums offer first-hand account of local history – by Karen Bachmann (Timmins Daily Press – March 8, 2019)

https://www.timminspress.com/

Timmins Museum curator Karen Bachmann talks about opportunities to get historic accounts “from the horse’s mouth.”

Three things I learned this week: 1) Never believe them when they say “it’s a done deal”; 2) Never say “yes” when you really mean “no, thank you” and 3) Never, ever, let someone else tell your story.

The first two I already knew – I just needed to be reminded of those principals. The last came as a hard lesson – especially for a curator who should, at the end of the day, know better.

Museums in particular are coming a little late to the party – while we house artifacts and objects and images, that stuff really is nothing without a story that makes it all come to life. I can have people walk through my collections area and look at artifacts, but the “stuff” becomes real for them when I can tell them a story that related to that artifact. Continue Reading →

Timmins at the centre of new gold mining documentary – by Maija Hoggett (Northern Ontario Business – March 6, 2019)

https://www.northernontariobusiness.com/

Click here for Part 1 and 2: https://bit.ly/2UqZJr2 and https://bit.ly/2TySjp5

With gold running deep through the region’s veins, a new documentary is focussing on Timmins’ rich history with the industry. Northern Gold is an original two-part documentary series debuting on TVO this week.

“It is, in a nutshell, about the history of mining in Northern Ontario told through the lens of one mining town, Timmins, Ontario,” explained director/producer Catie Lamer.

Knowing that TVO was looking at exploring gold as a theme, Lamer started digging into different histories. In Northern Ontario, she said, they found an “untold hidden history” of its impact in gold mining and how the industry shaped Ontario and Canada’s economy. Continue Reading →

New report urges slowdown at Nunavut’s Mary River iron mine – by Jane George (Nunatsiaq News – March 5, 2019)

https://nunatsiaq.com/

The more Baffinland Mining Corp.’s Mary River iron mine in north Baffin ramps up production, the fewer relative benefits will flow to Inuit, a new report concludes.

“The most important thing is that ramping up production in the short term will result to significant loss of benefits to Inuit in particular and the territory more generally,” said Trevor Taylor, the Iqaluit-based vice-president of conservation for Oceans North, which commissioned the report.

The report, prepared by John Loxley, an economist from the University of Manitoba, found that Inuit occupy “a very small share of the jobs at this mine” and the rapid expansion of the workforce will in all likelihood further reduce the Inuit share. Continue Reading →

Chile set to revive its dormant cobalt sector (Resource World – March 4, 2019)

http://resourceworld.com/

Already a major producer of copper and lithium, Chile is gearing up to join the electromobility revolution by reviving its dormant cobalt sector.

During an interview with Resource World Magazine, Chilean Mines Minister Baldo Prokurica said the ultimate goal is for Chile to become a supplier of lithium ion batteries to the global auto sector

In order to achieve that goal, Chile is hoping to become a producer of cobalt in the near future, a move that would enhance the Latin American country’s ability to supply so-called battery metals, including lithium and copper, which are vital ingredients in the production of mobile consumer devices and electric vehicles. Continue Reading →

[Consolidate Ontario’s Mine Engineering Programs at Laurentian] OPINION: Three wishes for the North: number two – by David Robinson (Northern Ontario Business – February 28, 2019)

https://www.northernontariobusiness.com/

Ontario needs Northern development, but the way it plays its major pieces is stuck in the 20th century.

Greg Rickford, minister of Energy, Northern Development and Mines, emphasized investing in people and technologies. For Northern development, that means investing in people and technologies in the North.

Last month I asked what to ask for if Premier Doug Ford gives us just three wishes. For wish one, I suggested that we lobby for a cross-laminated timber industry. For wish two, I suggest we ask for brains. I’m not saying we don’t have brains. I’m suggesting the research and educational facilities that support our Northern industries should be located in the North.

Right now, the province takes tax money from Northern Ontario taxes and buys brains for universities in the south. For example, of the three Ontario universities offering mining engineering programming – Laurentian, Queen’s and Toronto – two are in southern universities, hundreds of kilometres from where the mining happens. Continue Reading →

Environmental assessment starts on Ring of Fire supply road – by Staff (Northern Ontario Business – February 28, 2019)

https://www.northernontariobusiness.com/

Webequie, SNC-Lavalin prepare study outline for airport-to-exploration camp route

The first step in a provincial environmental assessment (EA) of a supply road to the Ring of Fire is underway. Webequie First Nation, the community closest to the Far North mineral deposits, has initiated the EA study of a permanent road running from Webequie’s airport to the fly-in exploration camps near McFaulds Lake in the James Bay lowlands.

The length of the proposed road is 107 kilometres. According to a document posted Jan. 25 on a community road project web page, the EA’s terms of reference (ToR) are being prepared, which basically outlines the framework and the work plan for the study.

The ToR will be submitted to the Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks for review this spring. The actual environmental assessment, slated to start this year, is a three-year process. Continue Reading →

NAN lauds move to repeal Far North Act (Timmins Daily Press – February 27, 2019)

https://www.timminspress.com/

Nishnawbe Aski Nation (NAN) Grand Chief Alvin Fiddler is applauding the Government of Ontario’s plan to repeal the Far North Act.

“We strongly oppose the Far North Act and are encouraged that Ontario is taking a second look at this controversial legislation,” Fiddler said in a statement. “The Act was enacted without meaningful consultation to legislate our territory under the control of the province and threatens the inherent, treaty and Aboriginal rights of our people.”

“Ontario does not have free reign to do as it pleases in the Far North, and we will defend our right to control development so that the wealth from our lands benefits our people and the growth of our Nation. We welcome the opportunity to engage with the province, but any process must begin with government-to-government dialogue in our traditional territories. We are prepared to facilitate a consultative process for the development of the lands and resources in NAN territory. Continue Reading →

Introducing our new publication: ‘The Drift’ – by Staff (Northern Ontario Business – February 26, 2019)

(Cover photo courtesy of www.miningphotog.com)

https://www.northernontariobusiness.com/

Let us introduce you to Northern Ontario Business’ newest publication, The Drift. This 60-page, glossy magazine highlights the innovative work of the Northern Ontario mining service and supply sector.

In its pages we tell the stories behind the leading-edge companies, state-of-the-art products, and passionate, hardworking people that contribute to what is a $6-billion industry in Ontario.

Readers can find this publication at the Northern Ontario Mining Showcase during the 2019 convention of the Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada (PDAC), being held March 3-6, 2019, in Toronto. Continue Reading →

Sharing the natural wealth: Through industry partnerships, Wabun Tribal Council has the recipe for producing resilient communities – by Ian Ross (Northern Ontario Business – February 25, 2019)

https://www.northernontariobusiness.com/

Wabun Tribal Council executive director Jason Batise recalls a conversation with a provincial negotiator on a resource revenue sharing model that the former Wynne government planned to carry into the 2018 provincial election.

During a break, the senior bureaucrat took him aside and confided that these talks represented a “crowning achievement” in his professional career. “I’ve been in the public service for 25 years and this is the best thing I’ve ever done,” recalled Batise.

When it goes into effect this fall, the series of agreements between the province and 32 First Nations, including six from Wabun, enables them to receive 40 per cent of the annual mining tax and royalties from existing mines in areas covered by the agreements, 45 per cent from future mines, and 45 per cent of forestry stumpage. Continue Reading →

Confidence abounds over Ring of Fire development – by Karen McKinley (Northern Ontario Business – February 22, 2019)

https://www.northernontariobusiness.com/

NORONT CEO tells Sudbury audience ore could be mined from Eagle’s Nest by 2024

If all goes well, the first load of ore concentrate could be coming out of the Ring of Fire by 2024. But before that, a lot of variables need to be addressed. Most critically, government commitment to funding and permitting, as well as smelter selection and road construction.

Even then, Alan Coutts said Noront Resources has contingency plans for several scenarios. Even taking ore processing out of province, if need be.

He gave an audience gathered for the Sudbury chapter of the Canadian Institute of Mining’s annual Winterlude event an update on where the corporation is at in their plan on Feb. 21. Continue Reading →

Hudbay plans to spend $124 million to refurbish mill and double Lalor mine gold production (Thompson Citizen – February 20, 2019)

https://www.thompsoncitizen.net/

While recent news about the Northern Manitoba mining industry has mostly focused on ontraction and closures in Thompson and Flin Flon, Hudbay Minerals Inc. announced Feb. 19 that it expects gold production from its Lalor mine near Snow Lake to more than double by 2022 after it reopens the New Britannia mill, which will allow it to recover greater quantities of the precious metal from the ore.

Hudbay said in a press release that the refurbished New Britannia mill – a project the company will spend about $124 million on – is expected to achieve gold recoveries of 93 per cent from the copper-rich Lalor ore compared to current recovery rates of about 53 per cent at the stall Mill.

Hudbay intends to spend $10 million this year on the New Britannia mill, which will eventually be equipped with a copper flotation and dewatering circuit as well as a pipeline to direct the tailings to an existing facility. Continue Reading →

Minerals, Mining and the Green Revolution – by Emily King (Geology For Investors – February 2019)

https://www.geologyforinvestors.com/

While we still remain reliant on fossil fuels, there is tremendous momentum towards renewable energy in many countries. Increasingly, our homes and businesses are powered by solar panels and wind turbines. Nearly every year, new records are set for the amount of renewable energy power capacity added to global power grids.

Similarly, electric vehicles are being adopted rapidly and replacing their gas-powered fore-bearers. Within the next decade, there is expected to be an estimated 125 million electric vehicles on the roads, getting people and materials where they need to go without any gas or oil involved.

However, this green revolution will not run on bamboo; instead, it will require robust supplies of minerals, some of which can be difficult to obtain, to ensure that we can effectively harness the energy we need. Continue Reading →