Archive | Coal

Coal miners daughters story told at Davis Day ceremony in Springhill – by David Mathieson (Amherst News – June 14, 2019)

https://www.cumberlandnewsnow.com/

SPRINGHILL, N.S. – Springhill mining history came to life at the 2019 Davis Day service June 11 at the St. Andrews-Wesley United Church in Springhill.

“As was the practice in those days, the eldest son, Donald, my grandfather, went to work at a man’s job at the age of 13 to support his family,” Shawna Canning said to the crowd gathered for the service.

Born in 1913, Canning’s grandfather, Donald Arthur Campbell, was named after his grandfather who was killed in the 1891 explosion that killed 125 miners. Donald began working at the mine at the age of 13 after his father, John Campbell, was injured at the mine and was unable to work again. Continue Reading →

Greens Celebrate, As Nets Ignore Bloomberg’s $500M Assault on Coal – by Julia A. Seymour (NewsBusters.org – June 14, 2019)

https://www.newsbusters.org/

Former Mayor Michael Bloomberg reannounced a $500-million effort to eradicate coal and natural gas use in the U.S. on June 6. ABC, CBS and NBC news didn’t even flinch.

That night the three broadcast evening shows made no time for the billionaire media mogul’s massive spending to shut down the rest of the nation’s coal plants by 2030 and start targeting natural gas plants. They also haven’t reported it since, much less scrutinized it even though he’s a high-profile liberal donor, media owner and maybe former politician.

“We’re in a race against time with climate change, and yet there is virtually no hope of bold federal action on this issue for at least another two years. Mother Nature is not waiting on our political calendar, and neither can we,” Bloomberg said of his Beyond Carbon initiative. Continue Reading →

Norway fund may have to offload $1 billion stake in Glencore in shift away from coal – by Gwladys Fouche (Reuters U.S. – June 12, 2019)

https://www.reuters.com/

OSLO (Reuters) – Norway’s $1 trillion sovereign wealth fund may have to sell a $1 billion stake in commodities firm Glencore and other investments to meet tighter ethical investing rules adopted by its parliament.

Norway’s parliament agreed on Wednesday to the center-right government’s plan that the world’s largest fund would no longer invest in companies that mine more than 20 million tonnes of coal annually or generate more than 10 gigawatts (GW) of power from coal.

Environmental campaigners Greenpeace and Urgewald said the new rules mean the fund would have to divest its 2.03% stake in Glencore, worth $1 billion at the end of 2018 according to fund data. Continue Reading →

Adani could be ‘ice-breaker’ for six more proposed Galilee Basin mines, resources body says – by Jemima Burt (Australian Broadcasting Corporation – June 11, 2019)

https://www.abc.net.au/

A decision on the Adani groundwater management plan is set down for tomorrow with environmentalists saying if the Queensland Government gives the green light it will set a precedent for six other mines also planned for the region and allow Adani to break ground within weeks.

The Queensland Resources Council (QRC) said the other projects would have a “much easier run” if the rail line was already established and the environmental approvals had been cleared. QRC chief executive Ian Macfarlane said Adani was “actually the ice-breaker that will lay down those baselines and will provide the infrastructure”.

“What’s going to happen with the groundwater application and its potential approval is that any further applicants will have not only the infrastructure to get the coal out because the railway line will be there,” he said. Continue Reading →

Mining identity still runs deep in Cape Breton where coal is no longer king – by David Jala (Cape Breton Post – June 11, 2019)

https://www.capebretonpost.com/

GLACE BAY, N.S. — Is a coal mining town still a coal mining town once its mines are all closed? Yes and no, says a local academic who studies the cultural legacy that the industry has left on former mining communities like Glace Bay and New Waterford.

“We’re in the aftermath of industry and it cast a long shadow in that it helped shape our culture so much,” said Lachlan MacKinnon, an assistant professor of history at Cape Breton University who penned a 2013 article entitled Labour Landmarks: Collective Memory in a Cape Breton Coal Town.

“The work being done in the area is no longer industrial in character, but part of that culture remains, and you see that in events like Davis Day where young people who didn’t grow up with working coal mines still grow up in an atmosphere where those stories are still being told.” Continue Reading →

COLUMN-Coal price slump in Asia even as demand grows shows supply is the issue – by Clyde Russell (Reuters U.S. – June 12, 2019)

https://www.reuters.com/

LAUNCESTON, Australia, June 12 (Reuters) – Whenever coal prices decline it’s tempting for those opposed to the polluting fuel to think that demand is falling amid a move to cleaner renewable energies, but in the current cycle it appears oversupply is the main culprit.

Coal prices in Asia, especially the benchmark thermal grade at Australia’s Newcastle Port, have come under pressure in recent weeks, even as coal exports have actually been rising.

The weekly Newcastle price, as assessed by commodity price reporting agency Argus, dropped to $72.01 a tonne in the week to June 9, the weakest in two years and down 40% from its seven-year peak of $119.74 in July last year. Continue Reading →

Coal miners’ union urges silica regulation to curb black lung – by Jan Pytalski (Reuters U.S. – June 6, 2019)

https://www.reuters.com/

PIPESTEM, W.Va. (Reuters) – The head of the national coal miners’ union on Thursday urged the Trump administration to impose regulation on silica dust in mines, which researchers believe is responsible for a resurgence of black lung disease in central Appalachia.

The demand from United Mineworkers of America president Cecil Roberts comes as President Donald Trump tries to pump up U.S. coal production, mainly by rolling back regulations he deems burdensome to the industry.

“We are seeing the most serious levels of black lung, mainly caused by silica and there are no silica standards out there,” Roberts told Reuters on the sidelines of a black lung disease conference in West Virginia. “We desperately need more.” Continue Reading →

Trump’s Cuba gambit pushes Canadian miner Sherritt to the brink – by Paula Sambo and Danielle Bochove (BNNBloomberg News – June 5, 2019)

https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/

Sherritt International Corp. (S.TO), whose executives were once known as Fidel Castro’s favorite capitalists, is paying the price for its close ties to the struggling Caribbean nation.

The Canadian miner, which gets all its revenue from assets in Cuba, is being hit on multiple fronts by Donald Trump’s isolationism, plunging nickel prices and cost overruns. With the stock at 21 cents and its bonds trading at distressed levels, investors are starting to question the company’s viability.

“It all depends how the world unfolds in terms of commodity prices and the U.S.-Cuban relationship,” Chief Executive Officer David Pathe said in an interview this week. “There’s only so much that we can do right now and that’s focusing on the things that we can control.” Continue Reading →

If the Adani mine gets built, it will be thanks to politicians, on two continents – by Quentin Beresford (The Conversation – May 30, 2019)

https://theconversation.com/

With the final approval of the Adani Carmichael coal mine now apparently imminent, it is important to ask how it has seemingly defied the assessment of experts that it is not financially viable.

After all, it’s only a week since the Chinese owner of another mine planned for the Galilee Basin, the China Stone mine, suspended its bid for mining leases because of commercial considerations.

The numbers appear not to add up because the location is remote, the coal would be expensive to transport, and the price is expected to fall. But such a purely financial analysis ignores the political forces driving the development of the coal industry in both India and Australia. Continue Reading →

Estevan mayor criticizes NDP outreach on coal jobs – by Arthur White-Crummey (Regina Leader-Post – May 15, 2019)

https://leaderpost.com/

“It is time to move away from coal, but you don’t move away from the people,” NDP leader Ryan Meili said while pushing the province to support miners during the transition

With Saskatchewan miners facing the economic hammer blow of a looming coal phase-out, NDP Leader Ryan Meili is pushing the province to do more to blunt the damage. But he earned the ire of Estevan’s mayor by supporting the very policy that’s threatening the industry.

“I actually think it’s a good decision. It is time to move away from coal, but you don’t move away from the people,” Meili said. “And that’s what I think Saskatchewan is really missing here. They’re saying it’s someone else’s fault, so we won’t help.”

Mayor Roy Ludwig agreed that the province is dragging its heels, but he had a simple message for Meili: “We would rather keep our jobs, thank you very much.” Continue Reading →

Voters Won’t Decide the Future of Energy – by David Fickling (Bloomberg/Yahoo News – May 20, 2019)

https://news.yahoo.com/

(Bloomberg Opinion) — Who decides the future of energy – the producers, or the consumers?

It’s a question that’s been asked at least since the 1970s, when the growing muscle of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and the 1973 oil embargo sparked the founding of the International Energy Agency as a rival group to represent the interests of oil importers.

That same pattern has been playing out in recent days with elections in one of the world’s biggest energy exporters and one of its biggest importers. Both will have a crucial impact on the direction of global energy policies – particularly in its dirtiest form, fossil fuels. Continue Reading →

COLUMN-Australia’s shock election shows killing coal mining is no sure thing – by Clyde Russell (Reuters U.S. – May 19, 2019)

https://www.reuters.com/

LAUNCESTON, Australia, May 19 (Reuters) – While Australia’s opposition Labor Party is the obvious loser from the weekend election, the anti-coal environmental lobby suffered probably a bigger blow and will need to re-think its strategy to end mining of the polluting fuel.

The conservative Liberal Party-led coalition is likely to have pulled off one of the great political escapes by returning to office for a third term, confounding polls and pundits who thought Labor was a near certainty to win the May 18 election.

While Prime Minister Scott Morrison may not secure an outright majority in the 151-seat lower house of parliament, results indicated that Labor, led by former unionist Bill Shorten, would have no chance of victory. Continue Reading →

N.S. mine where roof collapsed allowed limited production increase (Canadian Press/Financial Post – May 15, 2019)

https://business.financialpost.com/

DONKIN, N.S. — Nova Scotia’s Labour Department has allowed a limited increase in production at Canada’s only operating underground coal mine after a series of roof collapses last year.

Kameron Coal’s operations in Cape Breton were suspended for just under a month by the province in late December before it was allowed to partially resume activities in one portion of the mine while it prepared a revised roof support plan.

Scott Nauss, the province’s senior director of inspection compliance, said the new plan approved on May 7 allows Kameron to mine in two sections of the Donkin mine totalling 730 metres of added rock face, which is less than 10 per cent of the mine. Continue Reading →

World’s Coal Miners May Be Digging Themselves Into Another Glut – by Will Wade (BNN/Bloomberg News – May 10, 2019)

https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/

(Bloomberg) — A global push to dig new mines for steelmaking coal is drawing warnings that a supply glut could push the industry from a boom to a bust, mirroring the brutal 5-year price slump that ended in 2016.

Coal’s use to generate electricity has declined precipitously in the U.S. despite a revival push by President Donald Trump. That’s left metallurgical coal as the only part of the industry still thriving, with strong global demand and barely-growing supply combining to double the seaborne price since 2016 to more than $210 a metric ton.

Earlier this week, Consol Energy Inc. joined at least five other miners from the U.S., the U.K. and Australia in planning major new projects. It’s an aggressive strategy that has some worried the industry may end up boosting output too much too quickly, just as consumption slows. If so, prices could crater. Continue Reading →

Even Trudeau’s Canada Won’t Rid Itself of Coal – by Josh Wingrove (Bloomberg News – May 10, 2019)

https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/

(Bloomberg) — Scientists agree coal is choking the planet—so why is it so hard for governments to ditch? This is the last in a three-part series. Read parts one and two.

Set against lush hills, deep inlets and snow-kissed mountain peaks, Vancouver is the wellspring of Canadian environmentalism—and the heart of its climate dilemma.

British Columbia’s premier city prides itself on its green bona fides. The province is the birthplace of Greenpeace, ushered in Canada’s most successful carbon tax and is governed by a coalition that includes Green Party lawmakers. It’s also the one-time home to a young Justin Trudeau. Continue Reading →