Time to step up: resource sectors need Canada’s media more than ever – by Bill Whitelaw (LinkedIn.com – January 28, 2017)

https://www.linkedin.com/

Click here for policy document, The Shattered Mirror: http://www.ppforum.ca/sites/default/files/PPF%20-%20The%20Shattered%20Mirror%20EN%20Final.pdf

In this age of thought-leadership reports and white paper discussions that flutter around our lives like so much wedding confetti, there’s one document out there that deserves immediate attention – particularly in Canada’s resource sectors.

For those sectors read: energy, mining, forestry and agriculture – the industries that are the supporting vertebrae of Canada’s economic backbone. The sectors everybody increasingly seems to want to despise.

Every senior management team and board of directors in companies that derive their livelihoods from those various sectors should make this particular report required strategic reading. It will give them profound insights into what happens when a business model collapses dramatically in a way that directly impacts their own businesses, especially in terms of public perception.

And it may guide them to proactively support the policy pushes necessary to bring back Canada’s media sector from the brink of extinction.

Entitled The Shattered Mirror, it’s the product of research and consultation by the Public Policy Forum. It critically examines the state of Canadian media. The prognosis isn’t good. It paints a troubling picture of the diminished role Canadian media plays in mediating and shaping the discourses and narratives that define socioeconomic and political conversations.

Commissioned by Heritage Canada, The Shattered Mirror is more than a casual query into how digital forces are battering a largely analogue sector. It probes deeply into the costs our democracy and civil society face when institutions like newspapers are abandoned in droves.

Unfortunately, most resource executives are predisposed to crap on media. And I mean crap, in every smelly and repugnant sense of the word. There’s no way to put it elegantly.

Indeed, “media” has been largely indicted by those same leaders for being part of, if not entirely responsible for, the poor public image resource sector executives and managers argue plague their respective industries.

For the rest of this article, click here: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/time-step-up-resource-sectors-need-canadas-media-more-bill-whitelaw

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